Home / Knowledge / News / Textiles / New Method cleans up textile industry's most dangerous chemicals
New Method cleans up textile industry's most dangerous chemicals
07
Oct '11
Textile dying is one of the most environmentally hazardous aspects of the textile industry. During dying, harmful chemicals that are difficult to break down are released, all too often into rivers and agricultural land. However, Maria Jonstrup, a doctoral student in Biotechnology at Lund University, has developed a new, environmentally friendly purification process which leaves only clean water. The findings are presented in Maria Jonstrup's thesis.

The research is so far only research, and has therefore only been tested in the laboratory, but Maria Jonstrup is optimistic about its future potential.

“In the long term it should be possible for textile factories in India, China and Bangladesh to use the technique. If it works on a laboratory scale it is quite likely that it will also work in a real-life situation”, she says.

While working on her thesis, she has conducted experiments with both fungal enzymes and bacteria from the drains at textile industry and municipal wastewater treatment plants. However, it was only when she combined two different types of purification process, one biological and one chemical, that the breakthrough came.

“First, microorganisms break down the dyes in a reactor. This biological step is the most important. However, to be certain that the water is completely purified, I also use some chemicals. Small amounts of iron and hydrogen peroxide in combination with UV light break down even the most difficult structures”, she explains.

A combination of both biological and chemical purification is already used in some places, but these methods are rarely effective, which means that large quantities of hazardous chemicals are released.

Soon, two Master's students will be taking over the baton. They will spend a year testing the technique in larger volumes of water, which more closely reflect the conditions in real textile factories. Their challenge will be to study how the UV light in the chemical stage could be replaced with normal sunlight. Maria Jonstrup will be their supervisor. After that it is hoped that the technique will be tested 'live', in a real factory.

“Through contacts with the Swedish clothing company Indiska Magasinet and their suppliers, we have already taken samples and performed tests at a factory in India. Because clothing manufacture has received quite a bad reputation over recent years, it can otherwise be quite difficult to gain access to the factories”, she explains.

One obstacle on the path to implementation is legislation. The law only stipulates that the water is to be clean. This has made it legally permissible to filter out large amounts of environmentally hazardous mud and dump it on agricultural land and elsewhere – since the water itself is clean!

“But sometimes factories don't bother to clean the water at all and only do it when the inspectors come round”, she says.

The idea for the research came about whenMaria Jonstrup's supervisor Bo Mattiasson, professor of biotechnology, travelled in India in 2002 and visited the textile industries. He observed the problems and initiated the project that Maria Jonstrup joined. The project has been financed by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida).

Lund University

Must ReadView All

Textiles | On 22nd Feb 2017

Bangladesh exporters want duty-free access to US, Brazil

Garment and apparel exporters of Bangladesh are seeking duty-free...

Textiles | On 22nd Feb 2017

India to produce 341 lakh bales cotton in 2016-17: CAI

The Cotton Association of India (CAI) has maintained in its January...

Textiles | On 22nd Feb 2017

'India to be self-sufficient in silk production by 2020'

Indian could be self-sufficient in silk production by the year 2020...

Interviews View All

Karan Toshniwal
Orange O Tec

Contemporary industry is paying more and more attention to the...

Akash Khetan
Narayan Tex Fab

I find it hard to find professionals in Surat

Ajay Ghariwala
Luthra Group

We are ready to adopt or follow every opportunity

Giorgio Mantovani
Corman S.p.A

Giorgio Mantovani, MD of Corman, with a presence in both Milano and New...

Marten Alkhagen
Swerea IVF AB

Marten Alkhagen, Senior Scientist - Nonwoven and Technical Textiles of...

Silke Brand-Kirsch
Schlegel und Partner

Silke Brand-Kirsch, executive partner of Schlegel und Partner, a leading...

Karan Arora
Karan Arora

Bridal couture created with rich Indian heritage, exquisite craftsmanship...

Prathyusha Garimella
Prathyusha Garimella

Hyderabad-based designer Prathyusha Garimella is known for blending...

Judy Frater
Somaiya Kala Vidya

Among the many honours showered on Frater, including Fulbright and Ford...

Press Release

Press Release

Letter to Editor

Letter to Editor

RSS Feed

RSS Feed

Submit your press release on


editorial@fibre2fashion.com

Letter To Editor






(Max. 8000 char.)

Search Companies





SEARCH
February 2017

February 2017

Subscribe today and get the latest update on Textiles, Fashion, Apparel and so on.

SUBSCRIBE


Browse Our Archives

GO


eNEWS
Insights
Subscribe today and get the latest News update in your mail box.
Advanced Search