Home / Knowledge / News / Textiles / Textile pads to act as first aid in case of cardiac arrest
Textile pads to act as first aid in case of cardiac arrest
Jun '12
Textile cooling pads are to be used in future to prevent neurological damage after successful resuscitation. The system developed by scientists from the Hohenstein Institute in Bönnigheim requires no electric power, making it ideal especially for first aid in case of cardiac arrest.

For what can be done when for example a traveller collapses on a bus, train or aeroplane? Every year, 375,000 people suffer a cardiac arrest in Europe alone. The heart suddenly starts beating uncontrollably, the pulse becomes irregular. Within a few seconds the patient becomes unconscious and breathing and heartbeat stop.

For those affected, every second counts from this point on, because the patient's chances of survival decrease by ten percent with every second that passes until reanimation. Defibrillators have now become mandatory in public buildings and public transport. They use electric shock to restart the heartbeat.

For most cardiac arrest patients, however, even successful reanimation is merely a partial success – only a few patients survive this life-saving measure without consequential neurological damage. This is due to parts of the brain possibly sustaining lasting damage caused by the lack of blood flow and oxygen supply during the period until the ambulance arrives. This often results in the affected becoming invalid.

To avoid this type of brain damage in future, scientists from the faculty of Hygiene, Environment & Medicine at the Hohenstein Institute have developed a new therapy method for first aiders. In the framework of a research project supported by the state of Baden-Württemberg for the competition 'Biotechnology and medical technology', the scientists lead by Prof. Dr. Dirk Höfer developed the prototype of a textile cooling vest. The new type of medical product promises improved acute treatment for cardiac arrest by very quickly cooling down the patient's body.

It has been known for a long time that cooling can protect the brain against the dreaded oxygen deficit during a lack of blood flow. Targeted lowering of the temperature inside the body to 32 °C to 34 °C has been proven to protect the brain against irreparable neurological damage.

This simple but extremely effective therapy principle was used by the Hohenstein scientists. They started by developing water-proof and absolutely airtight textile hollow fabric – so-called cooling pads. These were equipped with appropriate connection options and integrated into a vest. The cooling pads are connected to a metal container under vacuum pressure containing a special mineral (zeolite).

When an interposed valve is opened, the water in the pads is instantly cooled down to nearly freezing (see info box), very effectively draining body heat from the patient's body at the same time.

The cooling system based on zeolite/water adsorption technology has a simple design and allows drastic lowering of the core body temperature after occurrence of a cardiac arrest at any time and in any place – without electric power! In future the self-sufficient cooling pads are intended to complement mobile defibrillators (with automated ECG analysis) for use by first aiders without medical knowledge e.g. in public buildings and public transport. For patients with cardiac arrest this means a much better chance of sustaining only minor consequential damage.

Must ReadView All

Union textiles minister Smriti Irani addressing at the Texprocil Annual Export Awards. Courtesy: PIB

Textiles | On 22nd Oct 2016

Govt to extend special package to home textiles segment

The Central government is likely to extend the recently approved Rs...

Reebok Liquid Speed Grey. Courtesy: Business Wire

Apparel/Garments | On 22nd Oct 2016

Reebok’s Liquid Factory brings sneaker creation to US

Reebok, a pioneer in the sporting goods industry, has brought sneaker ...

Courtesy: GHCL

Textiles | On 22nd Oct 2016

GHCL to invest Rs 67.25 crore in textile division

Chemicals and textiles firm GHCL will invest Rs 67.25 crore in its...

Interviews View All

Abhishek Ganguly
Puma India

‘As a brand, Puma is always looking for new and innovative ways to inspire ...

Giovanni Pizzamiglio, Paolo Crespi & Riccardo Robustelli
Epson, For.Tex & F.lli Robustelli

‘The percentage share of printing in the global textile market is pretty...

Frank Gossmann
Rotorcraft AG

‘RT3 motto is: Do not check millimetres, check colours.’

Kai Poehler
Voith Paper GmbH & Co. KG

The glass mat industry is growing by five to eight per cent annually. Kai...

Mohammad Hassan
Biax Fiberfilm

About one in every 20 patients picks up an infection while hospitalised....

Steve Cole
Xerium Technologies

Steve Cole of Xerium Technologies discusses the industry. Xerium is the...

Mike Hoffman
Gildan Activewear SRL

Gildan Activewear, a manufacturer and marketer of branded clothing and...

Robert Brunner

Golfwear and menswear brand Devereux is set for greener pastures. Robert...

Karan Arora
Karan Arora

Bridal couture created with rich Indian heritage, exquisite craftsmanship...

Press Release

Press Release

Letter to Editor

Letter to Editor

RSS Feed

RSS Feed

Submit your press release on


Letter To Editor

(Max. 8000 char.)

Search Companies

October 2016

October 2016

Subscribe today and get the latest update on Textiles, Fashion, Apparel and so on.


Browse Our Archives


Advanced Search