Home / Knowledge / News / Textiles / US proposes buying of scarce textiles outside TPP-bloc
US proposes buying of scarce textiles outside TPP-bloc
23
Jan '13
The United States Government has put forward a proposal that allows procurement of scarce yarn, textiles and apparels from countries that are not signatories to the planned Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade agreement.
 
Addressing the 24th annual Textile and Apparel Importer Trade and Transportation Conference organized by the United States Association of Importers of Textiles and Apparel (USA-ITA) in New York, US Department of Commerce’s deputy assistant secretary for textiles and apparels, Kim Glas, said the US Government has suggested creation of a list of yarn and fabrics that cannot be manufactured or sourced from any of the TPP member countries.
 
The Government has proposed that those products that are in ‘short supply’ be allowed to be freely imported from non-TPP countries, while enjoying TPP duty privileges, Ms. Glas said.
 
The US Government has proposed that there be one ‘permanent short supply list’, which include certain types of tweeds that can be sourced exclusively from the UK, and another ‘temporary short supply list’, valid for three years, that will have products that are not currently available in the TPP countries but can be produced in those countries in future.
 
Ms. Glas said the proposal is aimed at appeasing concerns of US apparel importers regarding the restrictive ‘yarn forward’ principle mentioned in the draft TPP agreement.
 
Under the ‘yarn forward’ concept, all the products used in the making of a garment, beginning from yarn and extending to fabric and sewing thread, must have been produced in the TPP member countries to be eligible for duty privileges.
 
The ‘yarn forward’ principle ensures that countries outside the TPP-bloc do not benefit from the agreement.
 
Ms. Glas said the ‘short supply’ list is expected to be completed by mid-2013 and TPP negotiations are likely to conclude by 2013-end.
 
Besides the US, Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam are currently negotiating the TPP agreement, and the 16th round of negotiations are scheduled for March this year in Singapore.
 

Fibre2fashion News Desk - India

Must ReadView All

Courtesy: Nifttea

Textiles | On 27th Jul 2016

NIFT-TEA to develop waterless cotton dyeing machine

The NIFT-TEA Knitwear Fashion Institute is working in collaboration...

Textiles | On 27th Jul 2016

HK traders fear Brexit fallout

Hong Kong traders, regardless of sector, may have been left reeling...

Textiles | On 27th Jul 2016

Kraig Biocraft takes possession of Indiana property

Developer of silk based fibres Kraig Biocraft Laboratories has...

Interviews View All

Nuno Venda
ROQ

‘There has been an increase in demand for water based inks, rather than...

Milind Khandwe
Hindoostan Innovation Centre

‘Modern technical textile is an indispensable tool for science and...

Abhishek Ganguly
Puma India

‘As a brand, Puma is always looking for new and innovative ways to inspire ...

Mark Paterson
Technical Absorbents Ltd

Mark Paterson, R&D manager of Technical Absorbents Ltd talks about Super...

Silke Brand-Kirsch
Schlegel und Partner

Silke Brand-Kirsch, executive partner of Schlegel und Partner, a leading...

Marten Alkhagen
Swerea IVF AB

Marten Alkhagen, Senior Scientist - Nonwoven and Technical Textiles of...

Prathyusha Garimella
Prathyusha Garimella

Hyderabad-based designer Prathyusha Garimella is known for blending...

Jay Ramrakhiani
Occasions Elegance Wear

It is believed that by early 19th century, Varanasi weavers had moved away ...

Pranav Mishra
Huemn

Designers Pranav Mishra and Shyma Shetty’s Huemn is known for its...

Press Release

Press Release

Letter to Editor

Letter to Editor

RSS Feed

RSS Feed

Submit your press release on


editorial@fibre2fashion.com

Letter To Editor






(Max. 8000 char.)

Search Companies





SEARCH
june 2016

F2F Magazine

Subscribe today and get the latest update on Textiles, Fashion, Apparel and so on.

SUBSCRIBE


Browse Our Archives

GO


Advanced Search