Home / Knowledge / News / Textiles / Textile mill owners in Maharashtra agree to 48% wage hike
Textile mill owners in Maharashtra agree to 48% wage hike
Mar '13
Textile mill owners in Ichalkaranji, a town in Maharashtra’s Kolhapur district, have agreed to raise the wages of workers by 48.71 percent, bringing an end to 37-day long strike by powerloom and textile workers in the town, The Hindu reported.
Seeking a wage hike and better facilities at workplace, about 30,000 powerloom workers and 15,000 textile workers in the town launched a strike on January 21, paralyzing the production across all textile and powerloom units in the town.
Even after five meetings with the Labour Minister and a protest march to Mumbai, where representatives of worker’s unions appraised the state Chief Minister Prithviraj Chavan of their problems and demands, the issues of the workers could not be resolved.
Finally, after a long discussion, the mill owners came out with a proposal for increasing wages by 48.71 percent to 87 paise per metre, and an option of working in shifts of eight hours, which was accepted by the workers.
It is for the first time in past 28 years that textile workers have been offered an option of working in shifts of eight hours, as till now these employees had to work for 12 hours each day.
A worker who earned Rs. 4,500 to Rs. 5,000 per month while working for 12 hours per day before strike, would now earn about Rs. 8,000 to Rs. 9,000 per month, while working for 12 hours per day or Rs. 5,500 to Rs. 6,000 per month for an eight-hour per day shift.
Housing one of the country’s oldest textile industries and popularly known as the Manchester of Maharashtra, the town of Ichalkaranji is home to about 5,000 textile factories and is also one of the largest centres of small scale industries in India. 
Nearly 120,000 powerlooms operational in the town produce around 10 million metres of fabric each day, and has a turnover of Rs. 500 million per day. Working on powerloom for 12 hour per day, each worker produces around 40-43 metres of fabric.

Fibre2fashion News Desk - India

Must ReadView All

Union textiles minister Smriti Irani addressing at the Texprocil Annual Export Awards. Courtesy: PIB

Textiles | On 22nd Oct 2016

Govt to extend special package to home textiles segment

The Central government is likely to extend the recently approved Rs...

Reebok Liquid Speed Grey. Courtesy: Business Wire

Apparel/Garments | On 22nd Oct 2016

Reebok’s Liquid Factory brings sneaker creation to US

Reebok, a pioneer in the sporting goods industry, has brought sneaker ...

Courtesy: GHCL

Textiles | On 22nd Oct 2016

GHCL to invest Rs 67.25 crore in textile division

Chemicals and textiles firm GHCL will invest Rs 67.25 crore in its...

Interviews View All

Abhimanyu Singh Rathore & Barbara Anna Kosiorek

‘Blending cultures is the true beauty of fashion, where one’s imagination...

Shawn Honeycutt
Bolger & O'Hearn

‘The Indian market is interesting and rather persistent in seeking new...

Giovanni Pizzamiglio, Paolo Crespi & Riccardo Robustelli
Epson, For.Tex & F.lli Robustelli

‘The percentage share of printing in the global textile market is pretty...

Steve Cole
Xerium Technologies

Steve Cole of Xerium Technologies discusses the industry. Xerium is the...

Urs Stalder
Sanitized AG

Urs Stalder, CEO, Sanitized AG, talks about the increasing use of hygiene...

Eamonn Tighe
Nature Works LLC

Eamonn Tighe, Fibres and Nonwovens - Business Development Manager of...

Bani Batra

Bani Batra’s couture wedding collection is inspired by traditional Indian...

Prathyusha Garimella
Prathyusha Garimella

Hyderabad-based designer Prathyusha Garimella is known for blending...

Robert Brunner

Golfwear and menswear brand Devereux is set for greener pastures. Robert...

Press Release

Press Release

Letter to Editor

Letter to Editor

RSS Feed

RSS Feed

Submit your press release on


Letter To Editor

(Max. 8000 char.)

Search Companies

October 2016

October 2016

Subscribe today and get the latest update on Textiles, Fashion, Apparel and so on.


Browse Our Archives


Advanced Search