Home / Knowledge / News / Textiles / Researchers make progress on biotolerance of textile implants
Researchers make progress on biotolerance of textile implants
12
May '10
The capacity of a textile implant to be tolerated by the body–known as biotolerance – plays an important role in regenerative medicine. Nevertheless, the body does not always tolerate textile implants. Even modern implants made of resorbable biopolymers, such as polylactic acid, break down in the body after a certain period of time and decompose into individual acidic components. They can then cause considerable problems around the implantation site ranging from inflammations to rejection. That is why biotolerability is a decisive factor in the rapid generation of blood vessels at the implantation site (known as angiogenesis). New capillaries ensure that acidic decomposition products resulting from the breakdown of bioresorbable textile implants can be quickly transported away from the area. At the same time, the new blood supply guarantees that cells involved in building up tissue receive sufficient nutrients and the implant is integrated into the tissue rather than being encapsulated as a foreign body.

The Institute for Hygiene and Biotechnology (IHB) at Hohenstein has long been doing research on how formation of vascular tissue can be stimulated specifically on textile implants. Only recently, a research team made up of doctors and human biologists led by Prof. Dr. Dirk Hoefer showed that specially modified textile fibres are also suited for functioning as a matrix for adult human stem cells on the basis of which new, healthy tissue can be developed.

Now the scientists at Hohenstein have successfully carried out a ground-breaking experiment with respect to the tolerability of implants using an animal-free substitute method known as the chorioallantoic membrane assay. Textiles that had been colonised with stem cells were applied onto a chicken egg membrane with a dense network of blood vessels. The dense network of blood vessels of the CAM and its lack of immune competence create optimal conditions for investigation of a functional circulatory system. The scientists aim was to have the implant itself release the growth factors required to stimulate the formation of new blood vessels. The stem cells were to assume this function. The researchers first coated the fibres of the textile implants with specific adhesion molecules, then colonised them with adult human stem cells that are known to release growth factors for new blood vessels. In order to follow precisely the fate of the stem cells, before they were introduced to the implant, the "all-rounders" were genetically modified so that they produced a red, fluorescent pigment that allowed the integration of the stem cells in the surrounding tissue to be visually monitored

In several test series conducted in this way, the researchers observed directed vascularisation within the textile implant microscopically and macroscopically. New blood vessels grew within the implant and formed a functional capillary network. If the textiles were colonized with connective tissue cells that did not release growth factors, vascularisation did not occur


Must ReadView All

Textiles | On 27th Jun 2017

Govt defers tax deduction at source provision under GST

E-commerce players in India will not be required to deduct tax on...

Apparel/Garments | On 27th Jun 2017

Future Group aims Rs 12,000 crore in fashion business

Future Group, which runs retail stores across India under various...

Textiles | On 27th Jun 2017

AEPC & NSDL to help exporters with GST compliances

Apparel Export Promotion Council (AEPC) and National Securities...

Interviews View All

Cindy McNaull
Cordura

We have broad range of options in durable fabrics

Kaizad Hansotia
GetNatty

Competition is the best thing that can happen to a startup

Evelyne Cholet
UCMTF

‘France had a reputation of being big in new ideas, but poor in marketing...

Ashok Desai
Bombay Textile Research Association

Bombay Textile Research Association (BTRA) is a leading name in textile...

Eamonn Tighe
Nature Works LLC

Eamonn Tighe, Fibres and Nonwovens - Business Development Manager of...

Kai Poehler
Voith Paper GmbH & Co. KG

The glass mat industry is growing by five to eight per cent annually. Kai...

Aditi Somani
Aditi Somani

Aditi Somani specialises in luxury fusion wear with international cuts and ...

Judy Frater
Somaiya Kala Vidya

Among the many honours showered on Frater, including Fulbright and Ford...

Wendell Rodricks
Wendell Rodricks

"We should not compare India and the West. There are things we do that...

Press Release

Press Release

Letter to Editor

Letter to Editor

RSS Feed

RSS Feed

Submit your press release on


editorial@fibre2fashion.com

Letter To Editor






(Max. 8000 char.)

Search Companies





SEARCH

news category


Related Categories:
July 2017

July 2017

Subscribe today and get the latest update on Textiles, Fashion, Apparel and so on.

SUBSCRIBE


Browse Our Archives

GO


E-News Insight
Subscribe Today and Get the
Latest News Update in Your Mail Box.
Advanced Search