The world of fashion constantly witnesses something new from time to time. A new term has been coined in the history of fashion, and from the looks of it, it is here to stay! The term is Muslim fashion. Islamic revivalist movement insisted its men and women to dress modestly and religiously. But during the 1980s and 1990s, as the movement started getting heterogeneous, the covered styles of dressing began to transform into more fashionable styles. This led to the coinage of a new term Islamic or Muslim fashion in the global fashion industry. Turkey was one of the first to enter this market. During the 1990s, fashion shows displaying this trend started getting popular all over the world (instead of being limited to a few Asian countries), and today this concept is acknowledged all over the world.

It is a fusion of faith and fashion. Today, one can find designer Burqas (fully covered clothes with only a mesh screen before the eyes as opening), Hijabs (a scarf that leaves the face uncovered), and Niqabs (face veils that leave a slight opening near the eyes), and fashionable clothes for Muslim men like designer Pathanis (a knee length top with loose bottom wear), Bisht (Arabic cloak), and Kufis (rounded cap) in the market. They not only comply with the rules of Islamic dressing, but also provide a style statement to the wearer. These fashionable outfits are especially in demand amongst the Muslims residing in western countries, who also want to look trendy along with religious. These outfits are available in various designs and colors, and made of exotic material to add to the charm of the wearer.


Muslim women can be seen in traditional wears like Burqas, Paranjas, Chadors, and Abayas. All of these clothing varieties are just slightly different to each other. They are loose fitted clothes that cover their entire body. Those out of these, that do not cover the head, require a veil or Niqaab to be worn in addition. Indonesian and Pakistani women are normally seen in Tudongs and Dupattas respectively. Tudongs are fully covered clothes that leave the face open. They are a formal wear for women in Indonesia. Pakistani women wear long scarves called dupattas (without any color restrictions) along with Salwar Kameez. The most popular of all Muslim men's clothing is the Thawb a long robe that is up to the ankle-length, worn in Iraq and the Gulf countries. Men in Arab countries can also be seen wearing a Bisht on top of the Thawb. It is accompanied by a headwear called Igal.


There is a special attachment in the mind of the wearer with regards to these outfits. Though they have invoked controversies in other parts of the world, but their demand has not reduced in the world market. In fact, Muslim men and women now have various choices available with them. Recent surveys indicate that the demand for Islamic clothes keeps rising by 20 percent every year on an average. The market for Islamic clothing is huge in Asia, i.e. around $58 billion. Indonesia, followed by Malaysia, exports the most number of Muslim clothes in the world. Other textile giants are also looking forward to make their mark in the Islamic clothing exports industry owing to its increasing demand in the world market.