Home / Knowledge / News / Apparel/Garments / Nettle cloth explains Bronze Age trade connections

Nettle cloth explains Bronze Age trade connections

01
Oct '12
A piece of nettle cloth retrieved from Denmark's richest known Bronze Age burial mound Lusehøj may actually derive from Austria, new findings suggest. The cloth thus tells a surprising story about long-distance Bronze Age trade connections around 800 BC. The findings have just been published in Nature's online journal Scientific Reports.

2,800 years ago, one of Denmark's richest and most powerful men died. His body was burned. And the bereaved wrapped his bones in a cloth made from stinging nettle and put them in a stately bronze container, which also functioned as urn.

Now new findings suggest that the man's voyage to his final resting place may have been longer than such voyages usually were during the Bronze Age: the nettle cloth, which was wrapped around the deceased's bones, was not made in Denmark, and the evidence points to present-day Austria as the place of origin.
 
“I expected the nettles to have grown in Danish soil on the island of Funen, but when I analysed the plant fibres' strontium isotope levels, I could see that this was not the case," explains postdoc Karin Margarita Frei from the Danish National Research Foundation's Centre for Textile Research at the University of Copenhagen.
 
“The levels indicate that the nettles grew in an area with geologically old bedrock. We can only find rock with similar levels of strontium isotope in Sweden and Norway as well as in Central Europe.”
 
Karin Margarita Frei had to conclude that Bronze Age Danes did not use local stinging nettle for their nettle textiles.
 
It is Karin Margarita Frei who has developed the method to determine plant textiles' strontium isotope levels that has led to the surprising discovery.
 
Strontium is an element which exists in the earth's crust, but its prevalence is subject to geological and topographical variation. Humans, animals, and plants absorb strontium through water and food. By measuring the strontium level in archaeological remains, researchers can determine where humans and animals lived, and where plants grew.
 
The new discovery is the result of a collaboration between an international team of researchers from the Danish National Research Foundation's Centre for Textile Research at the University of Copenhagen, the University of Bergen in Norway, and the National Museum of Denmark. The findings are described in an article that has just been published in Nature's online journal Scientific Reports.
 
Karin Margarita Frei's work and the grave's archaeological remains suggest that the cloth may have been produced as far away as the Alps. 
 
 


Must ReadView All

New EU rules for a fairer online economy apply from Jul 12

E-commerce | On 11th Jul 2020

New EU rules for a fairer online economy apply from Jul 12

The European Commission recently published a set of resources to help ...

Pic: Inditex

Retail | On 11th Jul 2020

Inditex to invest €2.7 billion for 2020-2022 plan

Inditex, a Spanish fashion retailer, has announced that to accelerate ...

Pic: Shutterstock

E-commerce | On 11th Jul 2020

ING Bank launches fashion marketplace in Romania

ING Bank, the fourth-largest bank by assets in Romania, launched its...

Interviews View All

Textile Industry, Head honchos

Textile Industry
Head honchos

Increased need for online fitting solutions as retailers shift to...

Nishank Patel, Shri Dinesh Mills Limited

Nishank Patel
Shri Dinesh Mills Limited

Broad range of fabrics will sell well this financial year

Spokesperson, Hugo Boss

Spokesperson
Hugo Boss

'Hugo Boss works with carefully selected sourcing partners'

Yogesh Kanani,

Yogesh Kanani

Incorporated in 1999, Purani Textiless Private Limited is a leading...

Farheen B Rahman & Priti Jain,

Farheen B Rahman & Priti Jain

Founded by business-designer duo <b>Priti Jain and Farheen Rahman</b>,...

Alon Moshe,

Alon Moshe

Israel-based Twine Solutions is a technology start-up that has developed a ...

Keith McMillen, Bebop Sensors

Keith McMillen
Bebop Sensors

Bebop Sensors' smart fabrics allows for a new level of interaction between ...

Pranesh Sridharan & Berndt Koll, Lenzing

Pranesh Sridharan & Berndt Koll
Lenzing

The Lenzing Group produces Lenzing Lyocell and Modal cellulosic fibres of...

Thomas Ong P S, NanoTextile

Thomas Ong P S
NanoTextile

Malaysian company NanoTextile Sdn Bhd taps into the potentials of...

Priya Somaiya, Usha Social Services

Priya Somaiya
Usha Social Services

The Usha Silai label from Usha International is all set for a retail...

Yash P. Kotak, Bombay Hemp Company

Yash P. Kotak
Bombay Hemp Company

One of the directors of Bombay Hemp Company, Yash P. Kotak, speaks to...

Rupa Sood and Sharan Apparao, Nayaab

Rupa Sood and Sharan Apparao
Nayaab

Nayaab, an exhibition meant to celebrate Indian weaves, is in its second...

Press Release

Press Release

Letter to Editor

Letter to Editor

RSS Feed

RSS Feed

Submit your press release on


editorial@fibre2fashion.com

Letter To Editor






(Max. 8000 char.)

Search Companies





SEARCH

Leave your Comments


July 2020

Subscribe today and get the latest update on Textiles, Fashion, Apparel and so on.


Advanced Search