Fashion Fantasy defines 'The Chat of a New Generation'

May 13, 2008 - United States Of America

Social networks are big business but are shy on value to Moms who care about the safety and productive engagement of their tweens.

That's not the case, a social network and virtual world created by R. Lilly Tuckerwear, Inc, where members run their own virtual businesses. These tweens chat about their designs and stores and are seriously focused on being financially successful.

In the Fashion Fantasy Game tweens earn currency (Fashion Buckz) by selling their clothing and designs, and through contests and salaries while they use their earnings to design, produce and advertise. "How's Biz!" is the most frequently asked question in this dress-up game.

Some members report that teachers are now incorporating the game in their curriculum. "We are thrilled to see the girls actively competing in a skill-based game that takes concentration, effort and imagination," says Nancy Ganz, who created this dress-up game for her daughter and her friends, "and they love talking about the game and the contests!"

The Fashion Fantasy Game is a fashion game for girls, where players talk to each other about growing their businesses and "virtually" solve the issues confronted in a real-life economy.

The Help section provides detailed explanations of complicated business concepts while the Glossary exposes players to essential fashion terms.

This social network is bringing a value to end-users that parental gatekeepers appreciate. Mom/Entrepreneurscreated Fashion Fantasy Game.com because they wanted to engage the imagination of tweens in a productive activity that feeds a positive self-image. "This is a social network that we are proud to show off to other Moms," states partner Nancy Jackson Hodin.

The growth of registered tween players is now at around 10,000 per week. These tweens are part of the 66% of US Internet users who generally spend time in social networks on a monthly basis.

The popularity of this game is due in part to its focus on girls who, according to a Pew Internet & American Life Project, are more likely than boys to be blogging and creating social network sites.