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Laxmi Asu machine, a revolution in weaving sector

04
Dec '08
Laxmi Asu machine
The Laxmi Asu machine, created by Mallesham in Andhra Pradesh, has relieved women from 8-9 hours of labour everyday. This has brought a revolution in the weaver community.

Now the process of making a 'tie and dye' silk saree in Pochampally tradition will be much easier.

Mr Lalmuanzuala Chinzah, National Coordinator, Business Development & Micro Venture, National Innovation Foundation (NIF) told Fibre2fashion.com, “Traditionally, the process of making a tie and dye' Pochampally silk sari starts with the selection of silk thread. Using the process of Asu, a triangular shape is given to the threads and designs are drawn on this shape. Tying is done where required as per the design and the threads are then dyed in selected colours. Once dried and untied, the dyed silk threads are rolled into spindles. The spindles are used appropriately in looms and the sari is woven.”

Weavers when create a sari manually, it takes them four hours to weave one sari, which means two sari each day. Enough concentration and good eyesight is the foremost requirement. Limited designs can be created and further weavers suffer from severe shoulder pains.

On the other hand, “Laxmi Asu machine will help weavers to weave one sari in just one and a half hours. Now weavers can make 8 saris each day. Wide varieties of designs can be made and one rupee is the cost of electricity each sari”, stated Mr Chinzah.

Separate work centers for only Asu have come up especially for those who could not afford a loom.

Ladies who up till now were engaged in manual Asu process have now learnt to weave on looms like men. It enhanced the income of the family and also the hitherto male bastion has been encroached by women. The weaver community accepted this new role for women as it only brought higher income to the family.

Fibre2fashion News Desk - India


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