Home / Knowledge / News / Textiles / Hohenstein researchers improve functional sportswear

Hohenstein researchers improve functional sportswear

12
Jul '10
German manufacturers of sports textiles are among the most innovative companies in the textile industry. Researchers at the Hohenstein Institute in Bönnigheim are helping these companies to improve the functional properties of their textiles by developing practical construction guidelines.

In a recently completed research project: (AiF No. 15481 N), with funding from the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) provided through the Federation of Industrial Research Associations (AIF), they drew specific conclusions about the physiological comfort characteristics of a variety of different types of knitted garments. The textile industry will be able to use the construction guidelines that resulted from the research work to continue developing and optimising functional clothing for all kinds of different sports.

The research project entailed investigating a total of 34 assorted knitted fabrics in respect of their thermo-physiological characteristics. These samples varied in terms of their fibres (PES, PP, PA, WO and CO and some mixed fibres), weight per unit area (100 to 329g), surface finish (hydrophilic, bioactive) and knit structure(e.g. single-jersey or pique). Specially selected representative samples were tested in controlled trials involving volunteers wearing them in a climate-controlled room. The skin model was used to measure thermophysiological properties, i.e. how heat and moisture are transported through the textile. When this data was combined with the results of skin sensory testing, it was possible to work out a comfort rating for each sample. The textiles were assessed along the lines of the German school marks system, from 1 = "very good" to 6 = "unsatisfactory".

On average, all the knitted sports textiles that were investigated received marks that were satisfactory or better for sports textile comfort (TK(S)). Nine samples were awarded marks of 1.0 to 1.5 (= "very good"). Chemical fibres were at a distinct advantage when it came to transporting liquid perspiration and the way they dried. On the other hand, the natural fibre samples made of wool and cotton had the edge when it came to retaining perspiration. Comparing pairs of samples of textiles where the main fibre was polyamide, but with and without a hydrophilic finish, showed that the hydrophilic finish had a negative effect on the level of comfort, because the fabric took longer to dry. However, applying a hydrophilic finish to samples made of propylene or a mixture of cotton and polypropylene gave a better result for comfort because they did not stick to the skin so much.

Hohenstein Institutes


Must ReadView All

Pic: Kristi Blokhin / Shutterstock.com

Textiles | On 3rd Apr 2020

World Bank fast-tracks $1 bn COVID-19 support for India

In its largest ever health sector support to India, the World Bank's...

Pic: Shutterstock

Apparel/Garments | On 3rd Apr 2020

China's silk town Shengze sends face masks to Milan

The Shengze Chamber of Commerce in the city of Suzhou in China’s...

Pic: Shutterstock

Textiles | On 3rd Apr 2020

UK GDP to decline by 2.6% in 2020, projects KPMG

UK gross domestic product would decline by 2.6 per cent in 2020,...

Interviews View All

Top executives, Textile industry

Top executives
Textile industry

Sri Lanka has a good sustainable track record and strong stories to back it

Kaizad Hansotia, GetNatty

Kaizad Hansotia
GetNatty

Competition is the best thing that can happen to a startup

Nitin Soni, Dolphin Jingwei Machines

Nitin Soni
Dolphin Jingwei Machines

Taxation policies need to be made simpler

Atul Mittal,

Atul Mittal

Established in 1997, Pratibha Syntex produces over 60 million pieces of...

Kamal Kulshreshth,

Kamal Kulshreshth

Colorjet is among the fastest-growing wide format digital inkjet print...

Priyanka Gandhi,

Priyanka Gandhi

Established in 2016, Surat-based Shree Ganesh Yarns is a manufacturer of...

Tiasha Renganathan, Twinery Innovations by MAS

Tiasha Renganathan
Twinery Innovations by MAS

Twinery-Innovations by MAS is the innovation arm of Sri Lankan company MAS ...

Pranesh Sridharan & Berndt Koll, Lenzing

Pranesh Sridharan & Berndt Koll
Lenzing

The Lenzing Group produces Lenzing Lyocell and Modal cellulosic fibres of...

Dr. Rene Wollert, Freudenberg Nonwovens

Dr. Rene Wollert
Freudenberg Nonwovens

Dr. Rene Wollert discusses the current scenario of the global nonwovens...

Priya Somaiya, Usha Social Services

Priya Somaiya
Usha Social Services

The Usha Silai label from Usha International is all set for a retail...

Niti Singhal, Twee In One

Niti Singhal
Twee In One

Best known for convertible clothing, Indian brand Twee In One by designer...

Amiben Shroff, Shrujan

Amiben Shroff
Shrujan

From its modest beginning in the late 1960s, Shrujan has grown into a...

Press Release

Press Release

Letter to Editor

Letter to Editor

RSS Feed

RSS Feed

Submit your press release on


editorial@fibre2fashion.com

Letter To Editor






(Max. 8000 char.)

Search Companies





SEARCH

Leave your Comments


March 2020

Subscribe today and get the latest update on Textiles, Fashion, Apparel and so on.


Advanced Search