A cross linking treatment is reported for cotton fabric with DMDHEU (Dimethyl Dihydroxy Ethylene Urea) releases formaldehyde. Both formaldehyde and non-formaldehyde chemicals are used in the crease recovery finish. But the use of the formaldehyde chemicals in the garments experienced some other problems such as allergic, irritating in the human bodies.


A cross linking treatment is reported for cotton fabric with DMDHEU (Dimethyl Dihydroxy Ethylene Urea) releases formaldehyde. Both formaldehyde and non-formaldehyde chemicals are used in the crease recovery finish. But the use of the formaldehyde chemicals in the garments experienced some other problems such as allergic, irritating in the human bodies. An alternate approach is to finish the fabric with free formaldehyde agents.


The non-formaldehyde chemicals used are EDTA, Boric Acid and Sodium Acetate. These chemicals are used in the different material (cotton and polycotton) with different proportions (and at two different temperature). The relationship between various treated and untreated fabric properties are analyzed.


Review


Cross-linking of cotton by mono and di-sodium salts of phosphoric acid was reported by Gallagher. This work demonstrate that Esterification of cellulose can occur at pH close to 7 and suggest that partial salts of carboxylic acid might similarly cross link at elevated temperature. The study reported here is an exploration of the reaction of partials salts of carboxylic acid with cotton cellulose and a characterization of a variety of a cotton cellulose polycarboxylates including the measure of the stability of these esterified cottons. Di- and polycarboxylic acids have been applied to cotton print cloth from aqueous system and cross linking Esterification have been accomplished at an elevated temperature. The reactions and the modified cotton have been characterized as functions several variables, including the pH of the aqueous polycarboxylic acid reagent and the structure of the polycarboxylic acid.


It is evident from this exploratory extension of earlier studies on carboxylic acid that di- and polycarboxylic acids react readily with cotton at elevated temperature following impregnation of the cotton with an aqueous solution of the carboxylic acid, partial sodium salts of the acid, or a partial or complete amine salt of the acid. The broad variety of di- and polycarboxylic acids which reacts under these conditions affords a range of properties and potentialities.




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About the Authors:


P. Gnanavel is the Lecturer in Dept. of Textile Technology at KSR College of Technology, Tiruchengode and N. Sukumar is the Lecturer in Dept. of Textile Engineering at Bahirdar University, Ethiopia, Africa