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Max Mara debuts new line using high-tech fabrics
16
Dec '13
Weekend Max Mara presents a special project that underlines the constant commitment of the Group in the search of new and best performing raw materials, the first step towards the manufacture of a product of impeccable quality.

Max Mara Group has always focused on product design and women’s requirements: research therefore has a fundamental role in the creative process, and quality is a prerequisite to the creation of a fashion product.

The Max Mara Weekend brand has introduced in the spring-summer collection 2014 a selection of garments made of a special hi-tech fabric Made in Italy, using the NewLife yarn.

The name NewLife is significant because this yarn is obtained by converting recycled plastic bottles in Italy and transformed into a polymer spun into yarns by means of a 100% Made in Italy mechanical rather than chemical process.

The manufacturing process is highly innovative, fully traceable, entirely mechanical and Made in Italy; it allows considerable savings in water and energy resources and a significant reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. All this translates into an item of clothing, which combines fashion contents with a responsible choice as regards the environment and society.

A debut in the collection, faithful however to the philosophy of Max Mara, which has installed 11,000 solar panels for the production of eco-friendly electricity. Sustainability, quality and attention to fashion blend in this cutting-edge style project by Max Mara Weekend, which proudly stems from 100% Italian research.

About Newlife

Newlife has been able to fuse fashion with innovation, combining 30 years of textile experience by Saluzzo Yarns to create a completely new kind of yarn 100% made in Italy.

It is created using a High Tech Conversion Model that transforms 100% traceable postconsumer plastic bottles into an unrivaled high tech quality polymer while generating considerable savings in water -94%, energy consumption -60% and carbon emissions -32% as per Life Cycle Assessment conducted by ICEA. Newlife is also GRS certified by Textile Exchange and is certified by Oekotex.

Newlife

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