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Fashion brands go extra mile to avoid PFCs in supply chain
06
Feb '14
Many fashion brands have committed to avoid the use of Per- and Poly-Fluorinated Chemicals (PFCs) from their supply chains after Greenpeace published investigations on the use of this chemicals being detected in children wear.
 
While speaking to Fibre2Fashion, Pierre Terras, Detox Campaigner, Greenpeace International, states, “Nineteen global fashion leaders, including Nike, Adidas, Puma, H&M, M&S, C&A, Li-Ning, Zara, Mango, Espirit, Levi’s, Uniqlo, Benetton, Victoria’s Secret, G-Star Raw, Valentino, Coop, Canepa, Burberry, and others, have already committed to Detox and will get rid of hazardous chemicals from their supply chains by 2020.”
 
“PFCs used by the textile industry to make clothing dirt and stain resistant are known to be highly persistent in the environment and can act as hormone disruptors, having adverse impacts on the reproductive system and the immune system,” he explains.
 
“These chemicals were also found in some Burberry’s children clothing. The good news is that Burberry has committed to eliminate all hazardous chemicals from all the products the brand produces or sells,” Pierre asserts.
 
“We have an active and on-going programme dedicated to reducing the environmental impact of our supply chain, working in collaboration with our suppliers and NGOs,” says a statement issued by Burberry. 
 
“This includes a commitment to eliminate from our supply chain the release of chemicals that have an environmental impact, going beyond required international environmental and safety standards,” the statement adds.
 
“For winter 2014, a significant part of our collection will be PFC-free,” claims Michel Rupp, CEO, Jack Wolfskin. 
 
“Renouncing them is a major challenge, since there are no real PFC-free alternatives with the same performance level available in the market right now. Nonetheless, we are optimistic to guarantee our consumers the same performance levels in the future as in the past,” he adds.
 
At least in Europe, there will be a shift towards products which are manufactured without using PFCs, he concludes.
 

Fibre2fashion News Desk - India


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