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Primark joins Greenpeace's global Detox campaign
11
Feb '14
British retail giant Primark joined the growing number of brands committing to eliminate all hazardous chemicals from its supply chain as part of Greenpeace's global Detox campaign.
 
Primark joins Burberry to become the second clothing company to sign a Detox commitment in the past two weeks. This news follows the release of Greenpeace's latest report revealing the presence of hazardous chemicals in children's clothes made by 12 major brands.
 
"Primark's commitment shows that it refuses to be left behind as toxic-free clothing becomes a fashion trend in the industry. From budget retailers like Primark, to luxury houses like Burberry, brands are helping put an end to this toxic nightmare. Laggards like adidas and Disney need to act now to stop these hazardous little monsters once and for all," said Ilze Smit, Detox Campaigner at Greenpeace International.
 
As part of its commitment, Primark agreed to eliminate all hazardous chemicals in all its products and across its production processes by 2020. Primark will also ensure supply chain transparency by requiring manufacturing facilities to upload data on hazardous chemical discharges via a publicly accessible platform. This will give the public and people living near these facilities in manufacturing centres like China the right to know what is being discharged into their environment.
 
"This commitment is great news for Primark's customers, its workers and the local communities affected by toxic-water pollution. It is now up to Primark to ensure these promises are translated into concrete actions so children everywhere can grow up in the toxic-free future they deserve," said Smit.
 
Building on this progressive move to improve conditions and transparency in its supply chain, Greenpeace urges Primark to now credibly resolve outstanding social issues related to the well-being of those working to produce its products. While the Detox campaign is calling for major clothing brands to create toxic-free fashion, Greenpeace believes good labour conditions and environmental protection should go hand in hand.
 

Primark

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