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Demand for Chinese textile and apparel products drop
30
Jun '08
US demand for Chinese textile has depicted a weak trend since the beginning of this year as the market share of six product categories in US witnessed a decline. This has aroused serious concerns among production enterprises in China.

Both textile and garment imports from China have shown a negative growth rate and this has been amply made clear from the statistics revealed by Textile Office of US Department of Commerce. The data showed that from January to April this year, US textile and apparel imports from China was recorded at US $8.699 billion, down by 2.64 percent from the same period last year and accounting for 30.35 percent of the total textile and garment imports made by US.

More concerning is the fact that the growth rates of some categories fell dramatically resulting in a serious shrinking of the market share.

In the period under review, textile and apparel imports from China reduced by more than 50 percent in terms of value compared to the corresponding period last year. Market share of some category declined by over 20 percent and included category 237 (garments made from cotton or man-made fiber), 613 (plain woven cloth made from man-made fiber), 627 (plain woven cloth made from blended man-made fiber), 733 (men's suit-jacket made from silk), 850 (skirts made from silk and plant fiber), 851(nightwear made from silk and plant fiber), and others.

However, as a matter fact, China is not the only country facing this situation; US market on the whole is experiencing a downtrend because of economic slowdown and weak demand for textile and apparel products. In the first four months of this year, total imports for these goods from around the world were registered at $28.661 billion, a plunge of 2.62 percent.

But China in particular, needs to be more guarded because other countries have started taking over its market share. The textile and garment industry of China faces a host of competitive pressures due to rise in production costs, appreciation of RMB, international trade frictions, strong and competitive neighbors. As a result, China has lost a lot of orders which has in turn resulted in contracting market share in US.


Fibre2fashion News Desk - China

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