Home / Knowledge / News / Uniqlo joins Greenpeace crusade to eliminate toxic fashion
Uniqlo joins Greenpeace crusade to eliminate toxic fashion
09
Jan '13
The biggest global fashion brand based in Asia, Uniqlo, and its parent company Fast Retailing Group, committed to eliminate all releases of hazardous chemicals throughout its entire global supply chain and products by 2020, in response to Greenpeace's global Detox campaign.

"Uniqlo recognises clean water as a critical global issue, and is proud to join Greenpeace in its campaign to eliminate hazardous chemical use," said Yukihiro Nitta, Fast Retailing Group Executive Officer and Executive in Charge of Corporate Social Responsibility.

Fast Retailing will accelerate the transparency revolution taking place in the sector by disclosing discharge data from at least 80% of their global suppliers (including all their facilities) in 2013. This will give people living near manufacturing facilities the right to know what is being discharged into their environment. The commitment covers all of the brands in the Fast Retailing Group, which include Uniqlo, Comptoir des Cotonniers, Princesse tam.tam, g.u. and Theory. Together they have over 2000 stores.

"Uniqlo becomes a global Detox leader by committing to use and lead the development of alternatives to hazardous chemicals. This is a victory for local communities around the world affected daily by toxic water pollution," said Junichi Sato, Greenpeace Japan Executive Director.

Fast Retailing Group becomes the twelfth global corporation to make a credible commitment to clean up its supply chain and products since Greenpeace launched its Detox campaign in 2011, and the eighth to provide a concrete date for when it will have eliminated all perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) .

"We welcome Uniqlo's Detox announcement and its commitment to open up the notoriously murky world of textile manufacturing to the public. Other brands such as Calvin Klein, Victoria's Secret and G-Star Raw also need to listen to their customers and urgently eliminate all hazardous chemicals from their supply chain and products," said Greenpeace Japan Toxics Campaigner, Hisayo Takada.

Greenpeace's Detox campaign demands fashion brands commit to zero discharge of all hazardous chemicals by 2020 and require their suppliers to disclose all releases of toxic chemicals from their facilities to communities at the site of the water pollution.

Greenpeace International


Must ReadView All

Apparel/Garments | On 23rd Sep 2017

AAFA urges negotiators to preserve TPLs in NAFTA

The American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA), an alliance of...

Textiles | On 23rd Sep 2017

SIMA urges Centre to re-look duty drawback rates

he Southern India Mills’ Association (SIMA) has appealed to the...

Textiles | On 23rd Sep 2017

PKR 690.65-mn budget for Pakistan Cotton Committee

The Pakistan Central Cotton Committee (PCCC) recently approved a PKR...

Interviews View All

Manfred Mentges
Sedo Treepoint GmbH

We see a higher demand in colour management systems, as customers see big...

Pratik Bachkaniwala
Palod Himson Machines

Fabric processing machines are picking up

Evelyne Cholet
UCMTF

‘France had a reputation of being big in new ideas, but poor in marketing...

Ashok Desai
Bombay Textile Research Association

Bombay Textile Research Association (BTRA) is a leading name in textile...

Mark Paterson
Technical Absorbents Ltd

Mark Paterson, R&D manager of Technical Absorbents Ltd talks about Super...

Larry L Kinn
Suominen Corporation

Larry L Kinn, Senior Vice President - Operations Americas of Suominen...

Rupa Sood and Sharan Apparao
Nayaab

Nayaab, an exhibition meant to celebrate Indian weaves, is in its second...

Divvya and Nidhhi Gambhir
Walnut

<b>Divvya and Nidhhi Gambhir</b> started their career with the launch of...

Bani Batra

Bani Batra’s couture wedding collection is inspired by traditional Indian...

Press Release

Press Release

Letter to Editor

Letter to Editor

RSS Feed

RSS Feed

Submit your press release on


editorial@fibre2fashion.com

Letter To Editor






(Max. 8000 char.)

Search Companies





SEARCH

September 2017

Subscribe today and get the latest update on Textiles, Fashion, Apparel and so on.

news category


Related Categories:

Planning to Take the Leap towards
Sustainability?

Do you see sustainability as a route to business growth?

Yes No

Do you think the sustainability space has the needed tools and resources available for a business to lead change?

Yes No

Active Poll

Do you see sustainability as a route to business growth?

Yes
74.5%
No
12.8%
Skip
12.8%

Total Votes: 47

Do you think adopting a sustainable approach will be a profitable move for your business?

Yes No

Active Poll

Do you think the sustainability space has the needed tools and resources available for a business to lead change?

Yes
61.7%
No
25.5%
Skip
12.8%

Total Votes: 47

Do you want the world to know about your sustainability journey and your business’ environmental footprint?

Yes No

Active Poll

Do you think adopting a sustainable approach will be a profitable move for your business?

Yes
87.2%
No
6.4%
Skip
6.4%

Total Votes: 47

Thanks for your valuable feedback. Claim your free latest sustainability e-book.

Active Poll

Do you want the world to know about your sustainability journey and your business’ environmental footprint?

Yes
70.2%
No
10.6%
Skip
19.1%

Total Votes: 47


E-News Insight
Subscribe Today and Get the
Latest News Update in Your Mail Box.
Advanced Search