Home / Knowledge / News / Uniqlo joins Greenpeace crusade to eliminate toxic fashion
Uniqlo joins Greenpeace crusade to eliminate toxic fashion
09
Jan '13
The biggest global fashion brand based in Asia, Uniqlo, and its parent company Fast Retailing Group, committed to eliminate all releases of hazardous chemicals throughout its entire global supply chain and products by 2020, in response to Greenpeace's global Detox campaign.

"Uniqlo recognises clean water as a critical global issue, and is proud to join Greenpeace in its campaign to eliminate hazardous chemical use," said Yukihiro Nitta, Fast Retailing Group Executive Officer and Executive in Charge of Corporate Social Responsibility.

Fast Retailing will accelerate the transparency revolution taking place in the sector by disclosing discharge data from at least 80% of their global suppliers (including all their facilities) in 2013. This will give people living near manufacturing facilities the right to know what is being discharged into their environment. The commitment covers all of the brands in the Fast Retailing Group, which include Uniqlo, Comptoir des Cotonniers, Princesse tam.tam, g.u. and Theory. Together they have over 2000 stores.

"Uniqlo becomes a global Detox leader by committing to use and lead the development of alternatives to hazardous chemicals. This is a victory for local communities around the world affected daily by toxic water pollution," said Junichi Sato, Greenpeace Japan Executive Director.

Fast Retailing Group becomes the twelfth global corporation to make a credible commitment to clean up its supply chain and products since Greenpeace launched its Detox campaign in 2011, and the eighth to provide a concrete date for when it will have eliminated all perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) .

"We welcome Uniqlo's Detox announcement and its commitment to open up the notoriously murky world of textile manufacturing to the public. Other brands such as Calvin Klein, Victoria's Secret and G-Star Raw also need to listen to their customers and urgently eliminate all hazardous chemicals from their supply chain and products," said Greenpeace Japan Toxics Campaigner, Hisayo Takada.

Greenpeace's Detox campaign demands fashion brands commit to zero discharge of all hazardous chemicals by 2020 and require their suppliers to disclose all releases of toxic chemicals from their facilities to communities at the site of the water pollution.

Greenpeace International

Must ReadView All

Textiles | On 17th Jan 2017

GST rollout from July 1; states to control small taxpayers

The Centre and states have reached a consensus on the issue of dual...

Textiles | On 17th Jan 2017

Reliance Industries net increases 3.6% in Q3FY17

In the three months ended December 31, 2016, India’s biggest private...

Courtesy: Carnegie Fabrics

Textiles | On 17th Jan 2017

Calera Capital acquires majority stake in Carnegie Fabrics

Private equity firm Calera Capital has bought a majority stake in...

Interviews View All

Smita Murarka
Amanté

‘There is huge demand in the Indian lingerie market for non-wired styles.’

Jim Desai
Blaiva Fabricaa

Fashion industry likely to remain labour-intensive in coming years

Angelina Francesca Cheang
MY ANJE

'Consumers in the age-group 21 to 38 are driving the activewear trend'

Lynda Kelly
Suominen Corporation

Suominen Corporation is a manufacturer of nonwovens as roll goods for...

Urs Stalder
Sanitized AG

Urs Stalder, CEO, Sanitized AG, talks about the increasing use of hygiene...

Marten Alkhagen
Swerea IVF AB

Marten Alkhagen, Senior Scientist - Nonwoven and Technical Textiles of...

Mike Hoffman
Gildan Activewear SRL

Gildan Activewear, a manufacturer and marketer of branded clothing and...

Robert Brunner
Devereux

Golfwear and menswear brand Devereux is set for greener pastures. Robert...

Pranav Mishra
Huemn

Designers Pranav Mishra and Shyma Shetty’s Huemn is known for its...

Press Release

Press Release

Letter to Editor

Letter to Editor

RSS Feed

RSS Feed

Submit your press release on


editorial@fibre2fashion.com

Letter To Editor






(Max. 8000 char.)

Search Companies





SEARCH
January 2017

January 2017

Subscribe today and get the latest update on Textiles, Fashion, Apparel and so on.

SUBSCRIBE


Browse Our Archives

GO


eNEWS
Insights
Subscribe today and get the latest News update in your mail box.
Advanced Search