Home / Knowledge / News / Textiles / Nike to use DyeCoo's waterless textile dyeing technology
Nike to use DyeCoo's waterless textile dyeing technology
08
Feb '12
NIKE Inc announced it has entered into a strategic partnership with DyeCoo Textile Systems B.V., a Netherlands-based company that has developed and built the first commercially available waterless textile dyeing machines. By using recycled carbon dioxide, DyeCoo's technology eliminates the use of water in the textile dyeing process. The name “DyeCoo” was inspired by the process of “dyeing” with “CO2.”

The partnership is illustrative of NIKE Inc's long-term commitment to designing and developing the most superior athletic performance products for athletes and its overall sustainable business and innovation strategy.

"Waterless dyeing is a significant step in our journey to serve both the athlete and the planet, and this partnership reinforces Nike's long-term strategy and deep commitment to innovation and sustainability," says Eric Sprunk, Nike's Vice President of Merchandising and Product.

"We believe this technology has the potential to revolutionize textile manufacturing, and we want to collaborate with progressive dye houses, textile manufacturers and consumer apparel brands to scale this technology and push it throughout the industry."

Nike has been exploring this technology for the past eight years and expects to showcase cutting edge apparel using textiles dyed without water at events later this year, with an eye towards scaling the technology for larger production volumes. '

"We're very excited to be partnering with Nike to help drive this together and believe the benefits and impacts of this technology are significant," says Reinier Mommaal, CEO of DyeCoo.”There is no water consumption, a reduction in energy use, no auxiliary chemicals required, no need for drying, and the process is twice as fast. The technology can also improve the quality of the dyed fabric, allows for greater control over the dyeing process, enables new dye capabilities and transforms fabric dyeing so that it can take place just about anywhere. We hope more industry leaders will join us in leveraging this innovative technology in the near future."

Conventional textile dyeing requires substantial amounts of water. On average, an estimated 100-150 liters of water is needed to process one kg of textile materials today. Industry analysts estimate that more than 39 million tonnes of polyester will be dyed annually by 2015.

Nike says it expects DyeCoo's supercritical fluid carbon dioxide, or “SCF” CO2 dyeing technology, to have a particularly positive impact in Asia, where much of the world's textile dyeing occurs. As this technology is brought to scale, large amounts of water used in conventional textile dyeing will no longer be needed, nor will the commensurate use of fossil fuel-generated energy be required to heat such large sums of water. The removal of water from the textile dyeing process also eliminates the risk of effluent discharge, a known environmental hazard. The CO2 used in DyeCoo's dyeing process is also reclaimed and reused.

Must ReadView All

Textiles | On 25th Mar 2017

GST to positively impact retail value chain: CBRE

The implementation of the Goods and Services Tax (GST) bill in India...

Textiles | On 25th Mar 2017

MEGlobal to build first ever US MEG plant

Monoethylene glycol (MEG) producer MEGlobal plans to construct a new...

Courtesy: Ulster Carpet

Textiles | On 25th Mar 2017

Ulster Carpets acquires Griffith Textile Machines

Northern Ireland based manufacturer of carpets, Ulster Carpets said...

Interviews View All

Saket Garg
Garg Corporation

The biggest challenge is lack of skilled workforce and competition from...

Karan Suratwala
Key Textile Accessories Private Limited

Chinese imports are destroying the supply chain

Subhashini Srinivasan
The S Studio

Ethnicwear market will see an upward trend if uniqueness and quality are...

Larry L Kinn
Suominen Corporation

Larry L Kinn, Senior Vice President - Operations Americas of Suominen...

Ashok Desai
Bombay Textile Research Association

Bombay Textile Research Association (BTRA) is a leading name in textile...

Kevin Nelson
TissueGen

Kevin Nelson, Chief Scientific Officer, TissueGen discusses the growing...

Mike Hoffman
Gildan Activewear SRL

Gildan Activewear, a manufacturer and marketer of branded clothing and...

Yash P. Kotak
Bombay Hemp Company

One of the directors of Bombay Hemp Company, Yash P. Kotak, speaks to...

Karan Arora
Karan Arora

Bridal couture created with rich Indian heritage, exquisite craftsmanship...

Press Release

Press Release

Letter to Editor

Letter to Editor

RSS Feed

RSS Feed

Submit your press release on


editorial@fibre2fashion.com

Letter To Editor






(Max. 8000 char.)

Search Companies





SEARCH
March 2017

March 2017

Subscribe today and get the latest update on Textiles, Fashion, Apparel and so on.

SUBSCRIBE


Browse Our Archives

GO


eNEWS
Insights
Subscribe today and get the latest News update in your mail box.
Advanced Search