Home / Knowledge / News / Textiles / Silver Bullet can make things like electronic clothing
Silver Bullet can make things like electronic clothing
28
Oct '09
With the development of a new silver ink, Xerox scientists have paved the way for commercialization and low-cost manufacturing of printable electronics. Printable electronics offers manufacturers a very low-cost way to add "intelligence" or computing power to a wide range of surfaces such as plastic or fabric. This development will aid the commercialization of new applications such as "smart" pill boxes that track how much medication a patient has taken or display screens that roll up to fit into a briefcase.

"For years, there's been a global race to find a low-cost way to manufacture plastic circuits," said Paul Smith, laboratory manager, Xerox Research Centre of Canada. "We've found the silver bullet that could make things like electronic clothing and inexpensive games a reality today. This breakthrough means the industry now has the capability to print electronics on a wider range of materials and at a lower cost."

Until now, bringing low-cost electronics to the masses has been hindered by the logistics and costs associated with silicon chip manufacturing; the breakthrough low-temperature silver ink overcomes the cost hurdle, printing reliably on a wide range of surfaces such as plastic or fabric. As part of its commercialization initiatives, Xerox plans to aggressively seek interested manufacturers and developers by providing sample materials to allow them to test and evaluate potential applications.

Integrated circuits are made up of three components - a semiconductor, a conductor and a dielectric element - and currently are manufactured in costly silicon chip fabricating factories. By creating a breakthrough silver ink to print the conductor, Xerox has developed all three of the materials necessary for printing plastic circuits.

Using Xerox's new technology, circuits can be printed just like a continuous feed document without the extensive clean room facilities required in current chip manufacturing. In addition, scientists have improved their previously developed semiconductor ink, increasing its reliability by formulating the ink so that the molecules precisely align themselves in the best configuration to conduct electricity.

The printed electronics materials, developed at the Xerox Research Centre of Canada, enable product manufacturers to put electronic circuits on plastics, film, and textiles. Printable circuits could be used in a broad range of products, including low-cost radio frequency identification tags, light and flexible e-readers and signage, sensors, solar cells and novelty applications including wearable electronics.

"We will be able to print circuits in almost any size from smaller custom-sized circuits to larger formats such as wider rolls of plastic sheets -unheard of in today's silicon-wafer industry," said Hadi Mahabadi, vice president and center manager of Xerox Research Centre Canada. "We are taking this technology to product developers to enable them to design tomorrow's uses for printable electronics."

R&D samples of the materials including the new conductive silver ink are available by contacting Xerox.

Xerox


Must ReadView All

Courtesy: Bangladesh Bank

Apparel/Garments | On 22nd May 2018

Bangladesh Bank enhances EDF loan limit to $25 million

Bangladesh Bank has enhanced the loan limit under Export Development...

Sri Lanka's textile imports up 32.5% in February 2018

Textiles | On 22nd May 2018

Sri Lanka's textile imports up 32.5% in February 2018

In what might be an indication of higher exports in the coming...

Provide power at Rs 8/kWh to textile units: APTMA

Textiles | On 22nd May 2018

Provide power at Rs 8/kWh to textile units: APTMA

All Pakistan Textile Mills Association (APTMA) has asked the...

Interviews View All

Poojaa Kumar Deepak
Zeven

Zeven's performance sports apparel is designed for the Indian body type,...

Cyril Pereira
Reed Exhibitions India, organiser of Asian Machine Tool Exhibition 2016

'Major problem in the textile machinery manufacturing industry is the lack ...

Top executives
Textile industry, India

The event should be organised every year

Ravindra Jain, Ashish Baid

Oswal Prints Private Limited has been manufacturing and exporting ethnic...

Rikesh Mistry

Jupiter Comtex Pvt Ltd, established in 1973, started its textile machinery ...

Paolo Crespi

For.Tex is an Italy-based leading producer of dyes and thickeners, and is...

Johan Berlin
InvestKonsult Sweden AB

Investkonsult Sweden AB has been buying and selling second-hand textile...

Kerem Durdag
Biovation II LLC

Kerem Durdag, CEO, Biovation II LLC, provides an insight into future...

Giorgio Mantovani
Corman S.p.A

Giorgio Mantovani, MD of Corman, with a presence in both Milano and New...

Tony Ward
Tony Ward

"You have to truly understand what your client wants, know her needs, what ...

Nisha Chanda
Whistling Woods International School of Fashion

<div>A lack of upgraded courses in costume designing and fashion as per...

Divvya and Nidhhi Gambhir
Walnut

<b>Divvya and Nidhhi Gambhir</b> started their career with the launch of...

Press Release

Press Release

Letter to Editor

Letter to Editor

RSS Feed

RSS Feed

Submit your press release on


editorial@fibre2fashion.com

Letter To Editor






(Max. 8000 char.)

Search Companies





SEARCH

Leave your Comments


May 2018

Subscribe today and get the latest update on Textiles, Fashion, Apparel and so on.

news category


Related Categories:

Advanced Search