Home / Knowledge / News / Textiles / Eco-Fashion: Going Green at The Museum at FIT
Eco-Fashion: Going Green at The Museum at FIT
02
Apr '10
The Museum at FIT presents Eco-Fashion: Going Green, an exhibition exploring fashion's relationship with the environment. “Eco-fashion” refers to the work of designers who use, produce, and/or promote sustainable, ethical, and environmentally-conscious products. Although eco-fashion is one of contemporary fashion's most compelling practices, fashion and the environment have had a longstanding, multifaceted, and complex connection rarely explored.

Featuring more than 100 garments, accessories, and textiles from the mid-18th century to the present, Eco-Fashion: Going Green will examine positive and negative environmental practices over the past two centuries, providing historical context for today's eco-fashion movement. The exhibition will emphasize how each stage of fashion production—from fiber to finished garment—has environmental consequences. The extensive range of contemporary examples in the exhibition will showcase the commitment of both designers and consumers to meet these environmental challenges.

Eco-Fashion: Going Green will begin with some of the finest examples of sustainable fashion by current, cutting-edge labels, including Edun, Bodkin, FIN, and NOIR. The approaches these brands take to social and environmental issues will act as lenses through which the exhibition will view the historical garments and their various effects on the environment.

The earliest object on display will be a silk brocade gown, circa 1760. Eighteenth-century silk was painstakingly woven on hand looms, making it costly, complex to manufacture, and cherished. Since garments with lasting value are integral to today's eco-fashion movement, this gown will act as a chronological starting point for the exhibition.

The garments and objects in Eco-Fashion: Going Green will reflect at least one of six major themes:

• the repurposing and recycling of materials
• material origins
• textile dyeing and production
• quality of craftsmanship
• labor practices
• the treatment of animals

The repurposing and recycling of textiles is sometimes considered the most innovative and responsible mode of eco-fashion. Historically, this concept has taken a number of forms. A dress circa 1840 was remade from an exquisite yellow, striped silk from the previous century. Highlighting the emphasis on recycling in the 1990s will be a Xuly-Bët dress incorporating worn sweaters and pantyhose.

Practices associated with the growth and manufacture of fibers have some of fashion's most environmentally destructive consequences. Although cotton is often viewed as a “natural” fiber, its production has often been especially damaging. The display of two dresses circa 1820 will emphasize that cotton growing during this time drained soil of nutrients and depleted water supplies environmental concerns magnified by the introduction of dangerous pesticides and chemical fertilizers in the 20th century. Today, organic cotton is used to make everything from basic T-shirts to a dramatic, one-of-a-kind evening gown by the influential eco-label Edun.

Must ReadView All

Textiles | On 9th Dec 2016

ACIMIT signs MoU with Pakistan textile bodies

In a bid to strengthen the trading in garments and textiles between...

Textiles | On 9th Dec 2016

‘Less demand may make it hard to achieve export target’

The $48 billion target for textiles and garment exports for 2016-17...

Textiles | On 9th Dec 2016

GST Council may decrease tax rates in future: CBEC

The goods and services tax (GST) Council might reduce the proposed...

Interviews View All

Ghanshyam Ghoghari
Kimora Fashion

Bridalwear is not about reds and whites anymore

Karan Toshniwal
Orange O Tec

Contemporary industry is paying more and more attention to the...

Shawn Honeycutt
Bolger & O'Hearn

‘The Indian market is interesting and rather persistent in seeking new...

Kai Poehler
Voith Paper GmbH & Co. KG

The glass mat industry is growing by five to eight per cent annually. Kai...

Ashok Desai
Bombay Textile Research Association

Bombay Textile Research Association (BTRA) is a leading name in textile...

Eamonn Tighe
Nature Works LLC

Eamonn Tighe, Fibres and Nonwovens - Business Development Manager of...

Rupa Sood and Sharan Apparao
Nayaab

Nayaab, an exhibition meant to celebrate Indian weaves, is in its second...

Karan Arora
Karan Arora

Bridal couture created with rich Indian heritage, exquisite craftsmanship...

Ritu Kumar
Label Ritu Kumar

‘Classics will return’ "There are a lot of people wearing western clothes ...

Press Release

Press Release

Letter to Editor

Letter to Editor

RSS Feed

RSS Feed

Submit your press release on


editorial@fibre2fashion.com

Letter To Editor






(Max. 8000 char.)

Search Companies





SEARCH
December 2016

December 2016

Subscribe today and get the latest update on Textiles, Fashion, Apparel and so on.

SUBSCRIBE


Browse Our Archives

GO


Advanced Search