Home / Knowledge / News / Apparel/Garments / Greenpeace finds hazardous chemicals in branded apparels
Greenpeace finds hazardous chemicals in branded apparels
20
Nov '12
High street fashion brands are selling clothing contaminated with hazardous chemicals that break down to form hormone-disrupting or even cancer-causing chemicals when released into the environment, according to a report released by Greenpeace International.

Greenpeace investigations found hazardous chemicals in clothing from 20 leading fashion brands, while fashion retailer Zara is alone in the study for having clothes that can give rise to both chemicals that are hormone-disrupting or cancer causing.

Greenpeace International’s investigatory report, “Toxic Threads - The Big Fashion Stitch-Up”, covers tests on 141 clothing items and exposes the links between textile manufacturing facilities using hazardous chemicals and the presence of chemicals in final products.

"Major fashion brands are turning us all into fashion victims by selling us clothes that contain hazardous chemicals that contribute to toxic water pollution around the world, both when they are made and washed," said Yifang Li, Senior Toxics Campaigner at Greenpeace East Asia.

One of the key findings is that all tested brands had at least several items containing NPEs, which break down into hormone disrupting chemicals, with the highest concentrations – above 1,000 ppm – in clothing items from Zara, Metersbonwe, Levi’s, C&A, Mango, Calvin Klein, Jack & Jones and Marks & Spencer (M&S). Other chemicals identified included high levels of toxic phthalates in four of the products, and traces of a cancer-causing amine from the use of cert ain azo dyes in two products from Zara. The presence many other types of potentially hazardous industrial chemicals were found across many of the items tested.

"Some of the Zara items tested came out positive for substances that break down to form cancer-causing or hormone-disrupting chemicals which is unacceptable for both consumers and the people living near the factories where these clothes are made. How can Zara be sure that more of its clothing lines are not contaminated with these hazardous chemicals?” said Martin Hojsik, Detox Campaign Coordinator at Greenpeace International.

“As the world’s largest clothing retailer, Zara needs to take the lead and take urgent, ambitious and transparent action to Detox their clothes and supply chains,” he said.

The items tested were manufactured mainly in the Global South, and included jeans, trousers, t-shirts, dresses and underwear designed for men, women and children and made from both artificial and natural fibres. Hazardous chemicals are both incorporated deliberately within the materials or left as unwanted residues remaining from their use during the manufacturing process.

“The textile industry continues to treat public waterways as little more than their private sewers. But our fashion doesn’t have to cost the earth: Our clothes don't have to be manufactured with hazardous chemicals,” said Yifang Li, Detox campaigner at Greenpeace East Asia.

Greenpeace demands fashion brands commit to zero discharge of all hazardous chemicals by 2020 - as brands including H&M and M&S have already done - and require their suppliers to disclose all releases of toxic chemicals from their facilities to communities at the site of water pollution.

Greenpeace International


Must ReadView All

Armtex Group gets incentives for textile unit in Armenia

Textiles | On 18th Mar 2019

Armtex Group gets incentives for textile unit in Armenia

Armenia recently granted textile manufacturer Armtex Group customs...

Pic: Gildan Activewear

Fashion | On 18th Mar 2019

Merger of athletic, leisure created new brands: Gildan

Merging of athletic and leisure categories in developed nations has...

Pic: Asteks

Textiles | On 18th Mar 2019

Asteks' AGV reduces workload in material transportation

AGV automatic guided vehicles developed by garment manufacturer...

Interviews View All

Akash Khetan, Narayan Tex Fab

Akash Khetan
Narayan Tex Fab

I find it hard to find professionals in Surat

Karan Suratwala, Key Textile Accessories Private Limited

Karan Suratwala
Key Textile Accessories Private Limited

Chinese imports are destroying the supply chain

Top executives, Textile industry

Top executives
Textile industry

Knowledge sharing platform needed for sustainable water management

Awanda Booth,

Awanda Booth

Held every year in New York City, Surtex is a global business-to-business...

Ritu Ajbani & Neha Agarwal,

Ritu Ajbani & Neha Agarwal

Petit Royal, co-founded by entrepreneurs <b>Ritu Ajbani and Neha...

Sarah Perkins,

Sarah Perkins

Fairfax, Virginia-based Specialty Graphic Imaging Association (SGIA) is a...

Dr. Rene Wollert, Freudenberg Nonwovens

Dr. Rene Wollert
Freudenberg Nonwovens

Dr. Rene Wollert discusses the current scenario of the global nonwovens...

Eamonn Tighe, Nature Works LLC

Eamonn Tighe
Nature Works LLC

Eamonn Tighe, Fibres and Nonwovens - Business Development Manager of...

Johan Berlin, InvestKonsult Sweden AB

Johan Berlin
InvestKonsult Sweden AB

Investkonsult Sweden AB has been buying and selling second-hand textile...

Sidharth Sinha, Sidharth Sinha

Sidharth Sinha
Sidharth Sinha

<b>Sidharth Sinha</b> has contributed to the successful rebirth and...

Rupa Sood and Sharan Apparao, Nayaab

Rupa Sood and Sharan Apparao
Nayaab

Nayaab, an exhibition meant to celebrate Indian weaves, is in its second...

Karan Arora, Karan Arora

Karan Arora
Karan Arora

Bridal couture created with rich Indian heritage, exquisite craftsmanship...

Press Release

Press Release

Letter to Editor

Letter to Editor

RSS Feed

RSS Feed

Submit your press release on


editorial@fibre2fashion.com

Letter To Editor






(Max. 8000 char.)

Search Companies





SEARCH

Leave your Comments


March 2019

Subscribe today and get the latest update on Textiles, Fashion, Apparel and so on.

news category


Related Categories:

Advanced Search