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Cocona's 37.5 fibres to have new biodegradable additive

22
Feb '20
Pic: Shutterstock
Pic: Shutterstock
All of the 37.5 staple fibres and filament yarns by Cocona, will now have a new biodegradable additive. The move has been taken after more than three years of research and testing of 37.5 products containing the new biodegradable additive. Products containing the new additive have been found to degrade significantly faster than untreated polyester products.

This announcement comes after more than three years of research and testing of the sustainable technologies available to textile manufacturing, and specifically testing 37.5 products containing this new biodegradable additive.

Cocona has announced that all of its 37.5 staple fibres and filament yarns will include a new biodegradable additive. This announcement comes after more than three years of research and testing of the sustainable technologies available to textile manufacturing, and specifically testing 37.5 products containing this new biodegradable additive.

“Starting July 1, 2020 Cocona is adding a biodegradable additive to all 37.5 polyester and polyamide staple fibres and filament yarns,” said Jeff Bowman, CEO. “Importantly, we have confirmed that the additive does not affect the ability of products to be recycled and will not add any manufacturing cost or complexity. Because of this, we will be providing this new additive at no additional cost to 37.5 fibre and yarn spinners.”

Dr. Gregory Haggquist, Cocona’s CTO, stated that, “After years of research we were unable to identify any unintended consequences and are confident this decision is in the direction of goodness.”

Third-party testing using the industry standard for biodegradation, ASTM D-5511, has shown that 37.5 products containing the new biodegradation additive decompose by 54 per cent in 341 days reducing to methane, carbon dioxide and a biomass in an estimated 3.35 years if disposed of in a landfill that simulates the conditions found in this standardised test. This is significantly faster than untreated polyester products that are not expected to biodegrade in less than 450 years.

“While there’s little doubt about the need for an answer to end-of-life biodegradation, we also recognise this is not the final solution. Our commitment is to continually evaluate and develop better and more sustainable ways to bring the benefits of 37.5 Technology to the marketplace,” explained Bowman. “We also intend to transparently provide consumers with information regarding the benefits and limitations of the technology.”

“37.5 Technology will continue to be marketed on the basis of comfort and performance. Products containing the biodegradable additive will be sold with a modified hangtag that calls out the presence of the biodegradable additive and includes a scannable QR code that takes consumers to a detailed section on the thirtysevenfive.com website where they can get more information on the additive and others sustainable technologies,” stated Cocona’s director or Marketing, Preston Brin.

Fibre2Fashion News Desk (SV)


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