Home / Knowledge / News / Textiles / Cotton contamination & stickiness remain challenge for spinning industry

Cotton contamination & stickiness remain challenge for spinning industry

08
Apr '10
“Despite some improvements in the recent past foreign matter, stickiness and seed-coat fragments in raw cotton continue to be serious challenges to the cotton spinning industry worldwide.” This is the general conclusion to be drawn from the “Cotton Contamination Survey 2009” which has just been released by the International Textile Manufacturers Federation (ITMF). The survey is carried out every other year, the 2009 edition being the eleventh in the series since the changeover to a new methodology in 1989. In the 2009 report, 110 spinning mills located in 23 countries evaluated 63 different cotton growths.

Contamination – unchanged in comparison to 2007
The level of cottons modestly or seriously contaminated as perceived by the spinning mills from around the world did not increase compared to the last survey in 2007 remaining constant at 22%. A closer look at the extent of the contamination shows that 6% (2007: 7%) of all cotton evaluated were seriously contaminated by some sort of foreign matter whereas 16% (2007: 15%) were only moderately contaminated. As the summary data are arithmetic averages of the different contaminants, the extent of contamination is fully illustrated only by the results for the individual contaminants. They range from 4% for “tar” (2007: 5%) to 42% of all cottons processed being contaminated by “organic matter”, i.e. leaves, feathers, paper, leather, etc. (2007: 40%). Other serious contaminants are “strings made of jute hessian” (32%), “strings made of woven plastic” (29%), “fabrics made of cotton” as well as “fabrics made of plastic film” and “strings made of cotton” (26% each). The most contaminated cotton descriptions considered for the survey originated in India, Pakistan, Egypt, Uzbekistan and Mali. In contrast, very clean raw cottons were produced in the USA, (Texas High Plains, Memphis, Pima, South Eastern, California), Israel, Australia, Brazil and the Ivory Coast.

Stickiness – record low
The presence of sticky cotton as perceived by the spinning mills fell in 2009 to 16%, the lowest level ever recorded (compared to 21% in 2007). Nevertheless, the level of stickiness is still considerable high and remains a major challenge to the spinning industry. Descriptions that were affected most by stickiness were those from Burkina Faso, Benin, Brazil, Chad, and Uzbekistan (medium staples). Also US cotton growths like US-Pima, Israel-Pima, Mali or Tajikistan (medium staples) were reported to be sticky. On the other end of the range, cottons from Egypt, Greece, USA (California, South Eastern), Australia, Ivory Coast, Nigeria, and Pakistan (AmSeed AFZAL, Others) or India (Shankar-4/6, MCU-5) were not or hardly affected by stickiness.


Must ReadView All

Pic: Shutterstock

Textiles | On 6th May 2021

China indefinitely suspends economic dialogue with Australia

The National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) of China has...

Pic: Shutterstock

Retail | On 6th May 2021

Ireland announces new €5 million COVID-19 Online Retail Scheme

Ireland has launched a new round of the COVID-19 Online Retail Scheme ...

Pic: Shutterstock

Textiles | On 6th May 2021

Cotlook A index expected to drop by 6.18% by June: TexPro

The Cotlook A index is expected to decline by 6.18 per cent in June...

Interviews View All

Textile Industry, Head honchos

Textile Industry
Head honchos

Blockchains will be in heavy use by early adopters by 2025

Textile Industry, Head honchos

Textile Industry
Head honchos

Virtual reality would be the new normal

Textile Industry, Head honchos

Textile Industry
Head honchos

One thing is certain, online sales will go up

Ritu Oberoi,

Ritu Oberoi

Mumbai-based Forsarees is a socially driven business enterprise, working...

Emmi Berlin,

Emmi Berlin

With the support of the first investors - Finland's Technical Research...

Raiyan Islam,

Raiyan Islam

Founded in 1981 by Sayeeful Islam, Concorde Garments Group is a market...

Sameer Sonkusale & Rachel Owyeung, Tufts University

Sameer Sonkusale & Rachel Owyeung
Tufts University

A team at the Tufts University in Massachusetts was recently in news for...

Karan Bose, Hula Global

Karan Bose
Hula Global

Hula Global, a leading isolation gown manufacturer in India, has been...

Wolfgang Plasser, Lenzing AG

Wolfgang Plasser
Lenzing AG

The Lenzing Group is an international company headquartered in Austria...

Sandeep Gonsalves & Sarah Gonsalves, Sarah & Sandeep

Sandeep Gonsalves & Sarah Gonsalves
Sarah & Sandeep

Established in 2012, Sarah & Sandeep is a luxury menswear label...

Megha Kumari & Jigar Mali, Label Megha & Jigar

Megha Kumari & Jigar Mali
Label Megha & Jigar

New Delhi based label Megha & Jigar blends India's unique handcrafts...

Suman Nathwani, Suman Nathwani

Suman Nathwani
Suman Nathwani

Designer <b>Suman Nathwani</b> talks about her journey of opening a...

Press Release

Press Release

Letter to Editor

Letter to Editor

RSS Feed

RSS Feed

Submit your press release on


editorial@fibre2fashion.com

Letter To Editor






(Max. 8000 char.)

Search Companies





SEARCH

Leave your Comments


April 2021

Subscribe today and get the latest update on Textiles, Fashion, Apparel and so on.


Advanced Search