Home / Knowledge / News / Chemicals/Dyes / Boras University finds ways to degrade dyes

Boras University finds ways to degrade dyes

09
Nov '19
Pic: Boras University
Pic: Boras University
Scientists in the University of Borås have developed a method for degrading the dyes, released in the environment during the process of dyeing textiles, and purifying the waste water. One problem the textile industry faces is that even the most efficient dyeing processes require large amounts of water, energy, and chemicals, damaging the environment.

Enzymes are used to initiate a degradation process of dyes and other chemicals. To achieve this, the enzymes need to be attached to the surface of a support material in order for them to function maximally. The degradation is usually done with the help of acids or oxidising solutions at high temperature and for a long time in the conventional methods. This means that the entire dyeing process consumes large amounts of water and energy and leads to emissions where large quantities of the dangerous substances are released into the environment.

In her research project, doctoral student May Kahoush worked on methods that contribute to the waste water’s being purified in an environmentally friendly way.

“In the dyeing process, the excess dyes and chemicals are flushed out with the waste water, which causes great damage to the environment. My goal is to develop an eco-friendly method of purifying the waste water before it is emitted” she explains.

She has investigated three different methods, all of which facilitate a solution that benefits both the environment and the textile industry by reducing the consumption of water and energy, as well as the emission of hazardous chemicals. The challenge has been how to attach the enzymes to a suitable material.

“We have used felted carbon fibre textiles, a common material used in many different applications, and using these textiles the enzymes can attach and help degrade the dye molecules. The carbon fibre textile is a porous lightweight material, that resists corrosion and that is easily formed, which can be used as an alternative to expensive, rigid metals. The carbon fibre also has good electrically-conductive properties, which is a prerequisite for getting the desired properties in electro-chemical applications,” she said.

One problem, however, is that the carbon fibre textile is water repellent. In this case, she wanted the material to absorb water, which is a prerequisite for the enzymes to be able to attach to it. Thus, there has to be a pre-treatment of the material.

In one method, she used an eco-friendly substance from a flower, the gardenia, which causes the enzymes to attach directly to the surface of the carbon fibre material. In the other method, she used an environmentally-friendly coating to attach the enzymes, and in the third method a cold plasma treatment was applied. The first two methods only demand small amounts of water, while the plasma method requires neither water nor chemicals and needs a low amount of energy.

Due to the enzymatic activity of the enzymes on the carbon fibre material, the substance hydrogen peroxide is formed which breaks down the dyes used in textile dyeing. This contributes to reduced emissions of the dyes and other pollutants.

The methods for immobilising the enzymes have several advantages, such as that they provide a stable process and that the enzymes can be reused. If they had floated around freely instead, there would have been a risk that residues of the enzymes would have remained on the dyed textiles, which could cause allergies and other unwanted effects.

In addition to the purification of water, the method can be used to identify substances to which the enzyme in question reacts, in this case to glucose. It is also possible to generate electricity from biological substances used to produce sugar or alcohol.

The project was implemented within SMDTex (Sustainable Management and Design in Textiles), a doctoral programme within Erasmus Mundus on sustainable management and textile design.

Fibre2Fashion News Desk (SV)


Interviews View All

Marazban F Velati, Sutlej Textiles & Industries limited

Marazban F Velati
Sutlej Textiles & Industries limited

No training can be effective till the candidate believes in it.

Headhonchos, Indian textile value chain

Headhonchos
Indian textile value chain

'One nation, one tax' is a great concept

Evelyne Cholet, UCMTF

Evelyne Cholet
UCMTF

‘France had a reputation of being big in new ideas, but poor in marketing...

Himanshu Jariwala,

Himanshu Jariwala

J Korin started as a partnership firm with four powerlooms in the textiles ...

Ravi Kant Prakash,

Ravi Kant Prakash

A crucial role in the process of fabric manufacturing is played by the...

Vikas Banduke,

Vikas Banduke

Softech Controls Private Limited (SCPL) is a part of the Cotmac Group, an...

Sachin Pendharkar, Dieffenbacher India Pvt Ltd

Sachin Pendharkar
Dieffenbacher India Pvt Ltd

Germany-based Dieffenbacher Group is a producer of high-quality composites ...

Sameer Sonkusale & Rachel Owyeung, Tufts University

Sameer Sonkusale & Rachel Owyeung
Tufts University

A team at the Tufts University in Massachusetts was recently in news for...

Iago Castro Asensio, RCfil Distribuciones S.L.

Iago Castro Asensio
RCfil Distribuciones S.L.

Iago Castro Asensio, International Business Manager of RCfil...

Amiben Shroff, Shrujan

Amiben Shroff
Shrujan

From its modest beginning in the late 1960s, Shrujan has grown into a...

Seema Agrawal, Artisan Saga

Seema Agrawal
Artisan Saga

Artisan Saga, founded by Kaushik Rajani and Seema Agrawal, is an online...

Sweta Agarwal, A Humming Way

Sweta Agarwal
A Humming Way

A Humming Way (AHW) is inspired by the old-world regalia of Rajasthan...

Press Release

Press Release

Letter to Editor

Letter to Editor

RSS Feed

RSS Feed

Submit your press release on


editorial@fibre2fashion.com

Letter To Editor






(Max. 8000 char.)

Search Companies





SEARCH

Leave your Comments


November 2019

Subscribe today and get the latest update on Textiles, Fashion, Apparel and so on.

news category


Related Categories:

Follow us on instagram

Follow

Follow Fibre2Fashion On


Advanced Search